Types of gay people

Articles

  1. Navigation menu
  2. Breadcrumb Navigation
  3. More on this topic for:
  4. LGBT A-Z (Glossary)

Paging Dr. Niche queens who will only go to events that cater to their specific genre of gay. Even at the zoo, a zebra has an occasional interest in sidling up to an antelope. Gays who, when they travel abroad, refuse to go to museums or theater—just gay bars! Why fly all the way to Florence or Prague when you might as well have stayed in WeHo? If your cultural tastes are that limited, why not just sit still at the Abbey and wait for the gay tourists from Florence and Prague to come to you.

They think all this progress simply appeared out of the sky, and it came about merely for them to enjoy it. If only the gay community could vote to eject them. Gay guys who fuck around on their boyfriends like crazy, but promptly end the relationship when they catch the beau even flirting with someone. The kind who talk endlessly about their husbands, whether it fits into the conversation or not. You nabbed a hubby! Fashion stylist gays. Not all fashion stylist gays, mind you—just most, I mean a lot, I mean some of them. According to an entrepreneurial source: The kind that gab interminably about their sumptuous beach house in Fire Island, Rehoboth, or Fort Lauderdale, but never invite you!

Pay attention, gays! But if one is counting people who say they experience same-sex attraction, that figure can quickly double. Karen Parker, who runs a newly created office at the National Institute of Health that is exclusively dedicated to research on sexual and gender minorities, known as SGM. For instance, her office—which was created because officials noticed health disparities affecting SGM and determined that the area was understudied—cares a lot more about actions associated with health risks than political identities.

What data can do. There is no shortage of research to bolster the anecdotal stories of discrimination and outsized hardships LGBT people still experience. Studies of sample groups have found, for instance, that LGBT people face more barriers to getting healthcare than the general public and that transgender women of color are at greatly increased risk for physical assault.


  • LGBT Terminology | LGBT Resource Center | USC!
  • gay escort services austin.
  • Editors' Picks!
  • Search form;

But experts say the true scope of those problems can only be fleshed out by large-scale data collection—and that such information will make it a lot easier to get the resources needed to fix problems like the extremely high rates of poverty experienced by transgender people and gaps in parental rights affecting gay couples with children, particularly if the numbers have the authority of being produced by the government itself. And the data they gather could pay direct benefits.

Navigation menu

County, says that when a hospital like his can provide data showing that they serve thousands of transgender people in an area, that can help them win millions in federal grant money to provide services transgender people often need, like hormone replacement therapy or mental health services, or to train the hospital staff on competent LGBT care. In speaking to some officials about quantifying the LGBT population, the whole thing can seem as simple as overcoming the sense that these are taboo subjects and adding a box to existing forms that already ask about things like race, gender and disability.

Yet logistical details can be hard to crack, as the United States Chief Statistician Katherine Wallman knows from decades in the field. Her office also approves questionnaires before they go out into the field. The technical experts representing the 21 agencies cover topics like health, labor and criminal justice, and they plan to produce guidance on data collection practices before the end of the year.

In doing so, their work takes three main forms. Certain areas of hard-to-reach fatty tissue may also be removed via liposuction such as areas near the armpits. Nipples are usually resized and grafted into place. A term often used by cross dressers to indicate wearing the clothes traditionally associated with your birth sex.

The painful and costly procedure of having hair permanently removed. MTFs and some cross dressers remove facial and body hair through electrolysis, while some FTMs undergo electrolysis before certain types of phalloplasty. A term often used by male-to-female cross dressers to indicate being cross dressed and not in traditional male clothes. Short for testosterone enanthate, one of the main injectable forms of testosterone prescribed to FTMs in the United States.

Estrogen therapy is administered to MTFs to induce the presence of feminine secondary sex characteristics. It may also cause softening of the skin, slowing or stopping of scalp hair loss, decrease in muscle mass, decrease in sex drive, decreased erections, and decrease in testicular size. Estrogen can be taken in pill, patch, or injection forms. A term primarily used to describe women who prefer the social company of gay men. While this term is claimed in an affirmative manner by some, it is largely regarded as derogatory. A person who was born in a female body but whose gender identity is male.

Also can refer to those assigned female at birth, in the case of intersex people, whose gender identity is male. Short for Female-To-Male. Sometimes also used by others who are born in female bodies and who move toward masculine or male presentation without hormones or surgery. Going full-time, or living full-time, in the social role of the sex opposite that assigned at birth. Term used to refer to the LGBTQI community as a whole, or as an individual identity label for anyone who does not identify as heterosexual. Unless someone chooses this label for themselves, it may be considered derogatory.

Examples include hairstyle, vocal inflection, body shape, body movements and gestures, facial hair, etc. Cues vary by culture. A condition identified by psychologists and medical doctors wherein a person who has been assigned one gender at birth identifies as belonging to another gender.

Breadcrumb Navigation

A person who, by nature or by choice, conforms to mainstream gender-based expectations of society. The societal, institutional, and individual beliefs and practices that privilege cisgender gender-typical people and subordinate and disparage transgender or gender variant people. A person who, either by nature or by choice, does not conform to gender-based expectations of society. A gender-variant person whose gender identity is neither male nor female, is between or beyond genders, or is some combination of genders.

Scrotal implants may or may not be added during these procedures. A professional organization devoted to the understanding and treatment of gender identity disorders. The organization is named after one of the earliest physicians to work with transsexuals, Dr. Harry Benjamin. The most widespread set of standards and guidelines used by professionals for the medical and mental health treatment of transsexuals.

The HBSOC are periodically updated and revised as new scientific and medical information becomes available. General term used to refer to over-the-counter herbal hormones that claim to simulate natural or prescription female or male hormones. An outdated term, usually considered offensive, for intersex persons.

More on this topic for:

The assumption, in individuals or in institutions, that everyone is heterosexual, and that heterosexuality is superior to homosexuality and bisexuality. Prejudice against individuals and groups who display nonheterosexual behaviors or identities, combined with the majority power to impose such prejudice. Usually used to the advantage of the group in power. Any attitude, action, or practice — backed by institutional power — that subordinates people because of their sexual orientation.

Those benefits derived automatically by being heterosexual that are denied to homosexuals and bisexuals. Also, the benefits homosexuals and bisexuals receive as a result of claiming heterosexual identity or denying homosexual or bisexual identity. The irrational fear or hatred of homosexuals, homosexuality, or any behavior or belief that does not conform to rigid sex role stereotypes.

It is this fear that enforces sexism as well as heterosexism.

Administration of hormones to affect the development of masculine or feminine secondary sex characteristics. Hormone therapy is usually continued for life. This surgery is often pursued by FTMs as part of the transition process, as well as for health reasons.

Lesbians Give Gay Men Wardrobe Makeovers

The idea that gender identities and expressions do not fit on a linear scale, but rather on a sphere that allows room for all expression without weighting any one expression as better than another. Refers to a homosexual, bisexual, transperson or intersex person who will not or cannot disclose their sex, sexuality, sexual orientation or gender identity to their friends, family, co-workers, or society. Arrangements of a society used to benefit one group at the expense of another through the use of language, media, education, religion, economics, etc.

The process by which a member of an oppressed group comes to accept and live out the inaccurate stereotypes applied to the oppressed group. Some intersex people are also transgender, but intersex is not typically considered a subset of transgender, nor transgender a subset of intersex. A type of FTM chest surgery procedure that is effective for individuals with small amounts of breast tissue. In the keyhole method, a small incision is made along the border of the areola usually along the bottom , and the breast tissue is removed via a liposuction needle through the incision. The nipple is left attached to the body via a pedicle a stalk of tissue in order to maintain sensation.

Once the breast tissue has been removed, the incision is closed.

LGBT A-Z (Glossary)

The nipple is usually not resized or repositioned. The term lesbian is derived from the name of the Greek island of Lesbos and as such is sometimes considered a Eurocentric category that does not necessarily represent the identities of African-Americans and other non-European ethnic groups. The heterosexist notion that any woman who prefers the company of woman, or who does not have a male partner, is a lesbian.

GENERAL TERMINOLOGY

Usually refers to a lesbian with a feminine gender expression. Can be used in a positive or a derogatory way, depending on who is using it. Is sometimes also used to refer to a lesbian who is seen as automatically passing for heterosexual. A male-bodied person who identifies as a lesbian. This differs from a heterosexual male in that a male lesbian is primarily attracted to other lesbian, bisexual or queer identified people.

A person who was born in a male body but whose gender identity is female. Also can refer to those assigned male at birth, in the case of intersex people, whose gender identity is female. Scrotal implants may or may not be added. First used in by British journalist Mark Simpson, who coined the term to refer to an urban, heterosexual male with a strong aesthetic sense who spends a great deal of time and money on his appearance and lifestyle.